23 Market

Past Exhibitions at Gallery 23

Jennifer Budd

Felted Paintings of Norfolk and Beyond - July 27 to August 27, 2017

Artist Statement – Jennifer makes felt using natural fibres. The felt pieces become woolscapes; landscapes created with fibres, needlefelting and embroidery.

They emerge from a place deep within her.

Jennifer’s hope is to invite a conversation between the maker and the viewer.

Leanne Ellis

Originally from Wales, Leanne moved to Canada in 2014, and in the process she switched her creative focus from a 10-year career in Illustration to exploring various methods of jewellery making.

Leanne’s work combines an intricate touch with an organic look. Aesthetically she finds inspiration in ancient craftsmanship, particularly that of the medieval period. Though her references often stem from old masters, her techniques are a combination of new and old, ranging from hammer and stamp to the alchemical mystery of silver metal clay.

This particular collection focuses on marrying metals, primarily silver and brass, and incorporating hand carved hollow forms alongside stamped designs on sheet metal.

* * *

Cristina Zanella

Vedere - June 22 to July 23, 2017

Cristina Zanella

A recurring theme in Cristina’s work is the treatment of light and dark, light playing on colour, and intensities of colour because of light. For Cristina, the subject matter is irrelevant. When people see her work, she’d like them to see it the way she sees it – for the treatment of the subject matter – balance, light, dark, depth. Cristina  feels  that the way she reacts to space and records the image in this manner, using line and colour, is a continual learning process with no limits and endless avenues.

Scholarships and Awards:

2010 – “Forces of Nature” Glenhyrst Gallery Juried exhibition Peoples’ Choice Award, Brantford, Ontario.2008 – Norfolk Visual Arts Competition Hazel Race Award, Simcoe, Ontario

1991 – Lambton College Art Scholarship, Sarnia, Ontario

1989 – Guelph Collegiate Vocational Institute, Helen Carscadden Art Scholarship, Guelph, Ontario

 

Joanne Munzar

Joanne is passionate about cooking, entertaining and gardening. Combining these passions, she creates functional pottery to serve her culinary creations. Her gardens have played an important role in her latest collection. She presses branches, buds, flowers and leaves into wet clay to create organic patterns. A sumptuous white glaze is applied to enhance the texture left behind by the plant imprint.

Joanne’s flair for fashion is exhibited in her jewelry and inspired by her annual trips to Montreal. She enjoys creating statement pieces. This summer season, red copal beads, large fresh water pearls, crystals, black onyx and lava stones are featured in her necklaces and bracelets. The clasps and silver forms surrounding the beads are created using a non-tarnishing silver ware. Joanne shapes and hammers the silver to create beautiful settings surrounding the semi-precious stones.

* * *

Bruce A. Milner and Don Howell

First Lift of Spring - May 11 to June 18, 2017

Bruce A. Milner

Bruce was born in 1948 and has lived his entire life in Port Dover. “House” as he is widely known, worked as a farmhand in his youth and in construction at Ontario Hydro and Texaco. Bruce also worked as a commercial fisherman in the 1970s and 80s. He has been deckhand, co-captain and captain on several of the smelt draggers fishing out of Dover.

In 1990, he left the lake and began a woodworking business, Woodhouse Pine, in the house he and wife Elizabeth and her father, Harry B. Barrett, built north of Port Dover. At the same time, House pursued a music career and formed a group, The St. John’s Road House Band, playing gigs around Southern Ontario.

Fred Eaglesmith produced Bruce’s first album of original songs, “Life is for Lovin”, in 1993 featuring Fred’s group The Flying Squirrels with the late, great Willie P. Bennett. Fred also produced a solo album of House’s songs about life on the North shore; stories of shipwrecks and fishermen, called “Livin’ On A Tin Can”, about 6 years ago.

Bruce began writing songs in 1966 and in the early 70s, eight of his songs featuring Port Dover’s Cal Dodd were recorded by CBC. Bruce and Cal and Rory Dodd were in a group together called Sunny Goodge Street in those days.

Bruce has written several musical scores for local theatre productions. In particular, “Steamer Atlantic” by Simon Johnston and “Wooden Boats and Iron Men”, which he co-wrote with past Lighthouse Festival Theatre director Robert More. Several of the songs were co-written by Bruce’s writing partner J.D. Semple. The play is based on House’s life and his becoming a fisherman. The play is lyrically driven and some of the songs deal with Long Point Legends.

House began carving and painting images of Port Dover fishing life in 1990 and has had his work presented at the Lighthouse Festival Theatre Gallery in Port Dover, Norfolk Arts Centre (Lynnwood) in Simcoe and Waterford Old Town Hall Gallery in Waterford. His folk art has been promoted by Phil Ross of Shadfly Antiques and has been purchased by several prominent collectors in and out of the area.

This show at gallery23 is a collection of new work with a couple of previous pieces. Bruce’s art depicts the iconic imagery of Port Dover’s marine culture. Low-relief carvings, wood-burnings, paintings on board and canvas, dioramas and boat models are the mediums employed. House’s art is an impressionistic caricature of his world.

 

Don Howell

Born and raised in Port Dover, Don and his family moved to California twenty-four years ago, where he now manages a large orchid nursery for a Dutch-based breeder and propagator. His interest in painting is somewhat of an accident. Don began constructing toyboxes for his grandchildren and others, painting their names on the front of each box. As his confidence grew, he added small scenes beside the name that would have a theme connected to the child. He has produced over 30 toyboxes so far.

Growing up on Black Creek in Port Dover, Don spent much of his childhood on the river at a time before the commercial basin was constructed and fish tugs lined both sides of the river. He got to know many of the captains and some would let him spend a day onboard shoveling smelt into the wooden crates and then icing them down. The history of each boat, the builder and who the previous owners were always was of great interest.

Paintings of the Dover harbour scenes by local artists always attracted Don’s attention and paintings collected over the years grace his home in California. His grandmother, Wyn Howell, was an avid painter and loved to paint harbour scenes. When she was not satisfied with her sketch of a fish tug, Don would draw it for her.

Don’s favourite painting is by a well-known artist who lived in Port Dover for a time in the 1960s, John Bechtel. John’s most recognizable work included the stage backdrop at the Summer Gardens and the large mural in Watkinson’s Men’s store. Bechtel also painted the Iveyrose tug with the Erie Beach in the background. The Iveyrose was a familiar sight in the harbour for many years. Don built a toybox and used Bechtel’s painting as the inspiration for the Iveyrose he painted on the front of the box. The result was good enough to encourage him to paint other Port Dover boats without being attached to a toybox.

In the past 2 years, Don has painted over 30 paintings focused on the Port Dover harbour and the boats that worked from there. He paints in acrylic and uses pine as his canvas. Don also makes his own frames and includes historical notes of each boat on the back of the paintings.

This will be the first time his work will be on exhibit and Don is excited to meet up with old friends and others who share an interest in Port Dover’s fishing past.

* * *

Michael Barber and Sierra Barber

New Paintings - March 30 to May 7, 2017

Michael Barber

Michael was born in Simcoe, Ontario in 1967. He has been creating ever since he can remember. Mike studied Graphic Design at George Brown College in Toronto. After working for different advertising agencies and feeling the need to grow as an artist, he started Strictly Visual in 1991, a graphic design studio where he began producing work that he felt was both creative and suitable for its application in the advertising market.

The desire to create freely and experiment without being concerned about marketability led Mike to painting. The inspiration for his work has come from his life and the lives of people close to him.

Mike’s work deals with examination of dark realities that are rarely spoken. “Memories and thoughts are never clear and his paintings reflect the layers that hide or protect the past, the things we cherish and the things we’d love to forget. Quite often in life things that are out of control have such impact on our lives, not physically, but emotionally – things we will carry with us forever. The good and the bad both weigh us down and fill us up to the point that there’s no room left. Then one day something happens that forces us to shift things, reposition and prioritize the weight to a more manageable point for the time being.”

Mike paints on mahogany plywood and uses a mixed media approach. Resist techniques are used with the paint application. Gouging and scratching is done with various hand tools; shovels and hoes are used to scrape the work and expose the earlier layers to create a sense of time. Images are applied to the work by using a very primitive printing technique and manipulating the cut after various applications.

“The creation of a piece is a very physical activity. I get lost in the painting and struggle between layers, caught in a dilemma of exposure and protection. It’s an exhausting process and yet I find it so satisfying.”

 

Sierra Barber

Sierra holds a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree from OCAD University and is currently basing her practice in Toronto, Ontario.

Sierra was raised in Silver Hill, a hamlet in Norfolk County. She began working with wax in 2010, after the ancient painting method called encaustic, was described to her by a family member. The painting technique was completely new to Sierra and she was fascinated by the idea of melting wax and using it as a liquid to paint with. She began a series of tests in her family barn and cobbled together her own understanding of wax painting. This curiosity has evolved into her full practice that now uses proper materials but is still based on earlier techniques that she has since learned to control and apply.

Beeswax is traditionally used as a preserver and over the past few years Sierra has been exploring the concept of preserving and storing memories in wax to prevent change. Her new series titled “Collection” combines both oil painting and encaustic on birch panel. Paintings of vintage collectibles are created in oil; contained within a beeswax honeycomb frame to interpret ideas of collecting, preservation and nostalgia.

 

Alice Lingard

Alice Lingard, a musician/performer/teacher, upon retiring, took her experience and moved into the art form of weaving baskets, beading pouches, creating copper jewellery and waxed linen pouches using a variety of materials. Reed, waxed linen, silver and copper wire, leather and other materials are used to create these beautiful pieces of art. Some baskets are utilitarian and some are simply seen as art objects. Dyed materials, basket designs and classes are developed in her studio in Strathroy. Alice shows her baskets and beads in art galleries and juried shows throughout Ontario. Her beaded works are intricate and made with beads that have been collected on five continents. She has spent some time in India teaching basketry at the Anglican compound in the slums of Durgapur in the northeast of the country. As well, Alice has taught basketry both south and north of the border and in Ontario. Her journey in basketry and beading has introduced her to many creative teachers and students who have become great friends and colleagues. Currently Alice’s baskets are sold at Main Street Gallery in Bayfield, Ontario along with her fur-cuffed mitts and hats, beaded pouches, waxed linen pouches with beads and shells and copper wire and beaded bracelets.

 

Gale Lemery

Gale Lemery has had careers spanning Education Assistant to the owner and operator of The Café in Waterford, Ontario, for twenty-five years. Gale was born and raised in Simcoe, Ontario and settled in rural Norfolk County with her husband, Neil and two children, Chrystal and Tenneil.

Gale’s thirst for knowledge and profound appreciation for nature and all it has to offer, allow this self-taught artist to express herself through many mediums. Thoughts of spring and new beginnings during a long, unsettled winter, along with her love of working with fabric, gave Gale the inspiration for this collection, “The Flock”.

* * *

Michelle Snively-Jefferies

"Not Far From Here" February 16 to March 26, 2017

 

Michelle Snively-Jefferies

Michelle paints in acrylics and mixed media while capturing the beauty in the ordinary with her special attention to colour. She enjoys composing paintings by shifting, dragging and manipulating the colours on canvas. There is intensity and spontaneity in her new works that reveals her passion for painting and her charismatic energy.

As a self-taught artist, Michelle continues to grow, renewing familiar composition by reactive efforts with colour, paint and texture.

She has experienced many group and solo exhibitions from 2013 to present and her paintings hang in the homes of private collectors across Canada and abroad.

Michelle also enjoys her work as an active instructor of art and home décor consultant. She continues her journey of self-discovery and invites you along on this expedition.

 

Mary Etta McGraw

Mary Etta has many interests in life; she loves to cook, sew, read, visit local art shows and theatre productions, and indulge her love of yummy food in our excellent local dining establishments. She also writes a column for our weekly Maple Leaf newspaper which always features a recipe or two.

She has always been a creative sort; crafting stage costumes for school productions, sewing her professional teaching togs (when appropriate), catering with Liz Campbell, dabbling in photography and other similar pursuits.

But polymer clay – well that has held her interest for many years now.

Mary Etta has been fortunate to take workshops with some of polymer clay’s finest artists; Canadian Helen Breil, Californian Dayle Doroshow, Germany’s Bettina Walker and many more.

This summer Mary Etta will attend the International Polymer Clay Conference in Philadelphia where she will learn from other great polymer artists and like-minded but not-so-famous women and men exploring this young medium.

Polymer Clay was first introduced commercially as a child’s craft clay – Fimo. Once discovered by artists, its growth as an artistic medium surged and demand for better quality clays grew. There are many polymer clays on the market but three of best in terms of strength, flexibility and ease of use are Premo! a Sculpey product, Kato clay, created through a collaboration between polymer artist Donna Kato and manufacturer Van Atken, and the new Fimo professional. 

 

Anne Armstrong (1951-2015)

Born in Nova Scotia in 1951, Anne grew up in Halifax.  Anne attended Dalhousie University briefly before relocating to Ontario where she studied photography at Sheridan College, graduating in 1974.

It was in the fall of 1974 that Anne attended her first night classes in beginners’ pottery.  Seven years later, in 1981, Anne established Brickworks Pottery after having moved to Norfolk County Ontario.

For the majority of her career functional pottery was her focus, each piece being hand thrown and decorated individually. Functional pieces from mugs and teapots to dip trays and dinner plates were available for purchase at her studio store as well as at many craft shows throughout Southwestern Ontario. 

Anne became involved with her local Potter's Guild in Norfolk county and began teaching workshops in 2002, later becoming more involved as a volunteer, teaching both beginners and advanced classes.

In 2004, fascinated with primitive firing methods Anne began to experiment with pit firing and Raku techniques for both porcelain and stoneware clay bodies.  These decorative pieces afforded her the opportunity and freedom to explore a multitude of forms. Much of her work from this later evolution in her journey was influenced by ancient Asian pottery.

Thoughout her life Anne received a number of awards for her work, taught classes locally and abroad including Berlin, Germany and had her work featured in a number of publications including 500 Raku by Lark Crafts and Pit Firing Ceramics: Modern Methods, Ancient Traditions by Dawn Whitehand.    

* * *

Rita Milton

"Stand on My Power" January 6 to February 12, 2017

Rita Milton

Rita Milton was born and raised in Oxford County. Having studied with local and international teachers she is now an award winning professional artist.

Working in several mediums with her own abstracted stylized method she creates unique works of art.

Rita has participated in numerous solo, juried, group shows and events. She has worked on several murals for the City of Woodstock and Town of Ingersoll.

Rita has been awarded several Ontario Arts council grants.

Along with being an active member of gallery and artists’ organizations, she has served on numerous art boards and steering committees.

She has attended workshops by several local, national and international artists, in places such as Russia, Ireland, Montreal, St. Louis, Florida, British Columbia, St. Marys, Woodstock, Fergus, London and Uxbridge.

Rita teaches and shares her enthusiasm for the freedom to create art.

Travelling internationally, she has represented Canada in The Netherlands. Her works are in gallery, corporate, hospital and private collections.

www.ritamilton.com

artisticflight@hotmail.com

 

Anne Armstrong (1951-2015)

Born in Nova Scotia in 1951, Anne grew up in Halifax.  Anne attended Dalhousie University briefly before relocating to Ontario where she studied photography at Sheridan College, graduating in 1974.

It was in the fall of 1974 that Anne’s desire to work with clay was finally realized as she attended her first night classes in beginners’ pottery.  In 1981 Anne established Brickworks Pottery after having moved to Norfolk County Ontario.

For the majority of her career functional pottery was the focus of her work, each piece being hand thrown and decorated individually. Functional pieces from mugs and teapots to dip trays and dinner plates were available for purchase at her studio store as well as at many craft shows throughout Southwestern Ontario. 

Anne became involved with her local Potter's Guild in Norfolk county and began teaching workshops in 2002, later becoming more involved as a volunteer, teaching both beginners and advanced classes.

In 2004, fascinated with primitive firing methods Anne began to experiment with pit firing and Raku techniques for both porcelain and stoneware clay bodies.  These decorative pieces afforded her the opportunity and freedom to explore a multitude of forms. Much of her work from this later evolution in her journey was influenced by ancient Asian pottery.

Though out her life Anne received a number of awards for her work, taught classes locally and abroad including Berlin, Germany and had her work featured in a number of publications including 500 Raku by Lark Crafts and Pit Firing Ceramics: Modern Methods, Ancient Traditions by Dawn Whitehand.

Each of Anne's pieces carries her determination, creativity and unwavering passion.   

***

 

Ellen McIntosh-Green

"Norfolk Scene" November 3 to December 11, 2016

Ellen McIntosh-Green paints the Norfolk countryside using colour, pattern and texture to reflect a union of figuration and abstraction. She works with oil and multi-media on canvas. Ellen attended the University of Waterloo for two years and graduated from the University of Toronto in English and Fine Art. She was formerly director of the Norfolk Arts Centre in Simcoe. Her exploration of Norfolk continues to inform and inspire her work.

Vera Cline-Hayes

Vera Cline-Hayes graduated from Central Secondary School in London, Ontario.  She furthered her studies, taking a two-year Fine Arts course where she developed her unique pen and ink style.

Upon graduating, she accepted a position in the art department of London Life Insurance Company.  Over the next several years, Vera continued to exhibit at shows across Ontario with her pen and ink designs.

She opened an art emporium in Waterford in 1987 and has continued her passion for art, exhibiting in the Norfolk Studio Art Tour and at various art shows.  In 2012 she was accepted into the prestigious Arts Country Juried Arts Competition.  As well she has been accepted in the juried Norfolk ArtsCo Visual Arts Competition, where she received honorable mention for her work.

On a commercial level, Vera’s artwork has been chosen by two American giftware companies for widespread circulation of her designs on various products.

We welcome Vera back to the gallery - this time with her brand of handmade jewellery, which she has designed using the same techniques she uses in her collage work to create unique, wearable art.

Marlene Morton

Marlene has been a full time professional artist along with her husband for over 26 years. As master puppeteers and puppet builders they have worked with all kinds of fabric and materials sculpting their unique puppet creations. Their work has been seen and collected by people worldwide.

About 4 year ago, Marlene has taken her sculpting skills in a new direction creating environmentally friendly One Of A Kind Fabric Sculptures using recycled materials and a fabric hardener imported from the Netherlands. She has become a certified fabric sculptor instructor through Paverpol Canada.

Her art is environmentally friendly using recycled materials such as old tee shirts, fabric textiles, paper, leather, moss, tree branches, various reclaimed metals, and more. 
With these materials she creates beautiful one of a kind sculpture pieces.

Byron Morton

Byron was eight years old when he received his first set of puppets and instantly fell in love with this creative art form. For many years Byron pursued his love of puppetry on a part-time basis and in 1990, along with his wife Marlene, formed Images Creative Puppetry. Images began with five main characters and in short time grew to a professional troupe of over 350 colourful puppet personalities.

In the past 25 years Byron’s art has taken him all over the world, performing, teaching and training in both theatre and television. He has worked with major corporations and educational institutions by creating award-winning custom puppet performances promoting their messages.

Byron has received the coveted Canpro Gold Award for the best children’s television show in the country. For seven years Byron was the principal writer and master puppeteer on the children’s show T.Q., broadcast through CTS. His puppets were seen by millions of children every week and are still seen by countless other children around the world as the show has been dubbed in many foreign languages. Byron has worked on countless film and video productions that have gone on to great acclaim.

Byron has worked on many stage productions such as Beauty and the Beast, Little Shop of Horrors, Nunsense, Seussical the Musical and more. He also directed and performed this last year at Lighthouse Festival Theatre, A Christmas Carol. He wrote the script and made the full-body puppets used in the performance.

***

Kathleen Pickard and Larry Monczka

Photographs - "Seldom Seen" September 15 to October 30, 2016

Early Arrival by Larry Monczka

Crack by Kathleen Pickard

 

Photography has been a serious avocation for Kathleen and Larry since 1979 when they first became aware of the work of the noted Canadian photographer and educator Freeman Patterson. Over the next few decades, each of them experienced several immersive week-long workshops with him. His emphasis on visual design and “seeing” has influenced their photography immeasurably.

More recently, they participated in a workshop given by George DeWolfe and Lydia Goetze on “The Contemplative Landscape” that introduced us to the application of mindfulness to photography in the field.

Kathleen and Larry have been honoured with three joint exhibitions of their photographs (2002/2006/2010} at the gallery of the Lighthouse Festival Theatre in Port Dover. In 2015, they were invited to present their images in an exhibition entitled “Hereabouts” at the Norfolk Arts Centre in Simcoe.

Selected photographs from their book entitled “Seldom Seen” will hang in an exhibition of the same name at gallery23 in Port Dover from September 15 to October 30, 2016.

For the past five years, they have been participating artists in the annual Norfolk Studio Tour, welcoming visitors into their home studio in Port Ryerse.

RaraAvisPhotos.com, their website, displays current work, ongoing and completed projects as well as galleries of archived images. Larry regularly posts photographs of Norfolk County on his Facebook page.

 

Deb Beard

Deb Beard has been developing her pottery style since 1995. Raku is her chosen expression to test this medium & observe the palette that she is always amazed by through the end results.  She draws from her interests in architecture, history, science, cultures, nature and day-to-day life.

M. Danyet Cunningham

M. Danyet Cunningham carves soapstone, limestone, alabaster, marble and slate. She is exploring the medium both in the round and through relief. Her work reflects the influence of myth, Celtic and Native work, Nature and her personal internal world. Some sculptures are abstract landscapes exploring flow and planes.

M. Danyet took the opportunity to train with Doug Stephens and George Pratt using a variety of stone types: Sandy Cline with Quebec Soapstone, Wayne Hill exploring Mask and Totem carving, John Sabourin with soapstone and Mel Andre with wood carving. She also studied interpretive painting of Native and Celtic Legends with David Johnson.

M. Danyet was an educator in Southwestern Ontario with degrees at University of Western Ontario: OCT; Honours Specialist – Biology and Kinesiology; Masters Arts – Kinesiology; Honours BSc – Pharmacology and Toxicology.

***

Walter Yarwood (1917-1996)

"Back Roads of Norfolk" July 28 to September 11, 2016

 

In the early 1950s, the Toronto art scene was given a significant nudge forward with the advent of a group of painters that would come to be known as the Painters Eleven. These nine men and two women banded together to elicit a greater impact, to show Toronto art lovers the importance that Abstract Expressionism was having on an international level and to grow interest and legitimacy in the form. They revolutionized and enlivened contemporary art in Toronto and across Canada.

Walter Yarwood was born in 1917 in Toronto, attended the Western Technical School art program, married Helen Durnan in 1942, and together they had five children. In order to support his family, he took a job in advertising, relegating his painting to weekends, slowly gaining a strong reputation as an artist throughout the forties. He gained confidence through experimentation with rich, deep colour and bold shape, eventually moving away from landscape, toward abstract expressionism.

In 1953, eleven Toronto artists, including Yarwood, joined forces, becoming the Painters Eleven.  Their collective goal was to turn Canadian landscape art on its head. To this end they decided that they would exhibit as a group rather than solo, drawing much more attention. Their first exhibition was held at the Roberts Gallery in 1954 and although it started slowly, the exhibition drew more visitors during the two week run than any other in Roberts Gallery history (1842-1954).

From 1954 to ’59, Painters Eleven exhibited their works regularly and Yarwood’s style continued to become more entrenched in the abstract, garnering positive reviews and prizes. In 1960, Painters Eleven officially disbanded although the artists still exhibited solo and in groups. Yarwood changed direction and began creating large sculptural pieces, many of which were inspired by his canoeing trips and wilderness adventures. He worked in bronze or monel metal, an alloy of nickel and copper. He also created smaller pieces in aluminum.

Yarwood taught art and design at Humber College for some years and retired in 1982 at the age of sixty-five. Walter and Helen moved to Port Rowan on Lake Erie and he returned to painting landscapes, his style reverting back to figurative portrayals of forests, farmland and seascapes. The picturesque shores and countryside provided much inspiration. He made frequent trips to Georgian Bay as well; painting the land he had so dearly loved as a younger man. These later landscapes are breathtaking in their understated beauty, clear proof of Yarwood’s talent and skill as a painter.

Yarwood and his wife, Helen, both died in the area, Helen in 1993 and Walter in 1996.

Much of Yarwood’s abstract work can be found in personal collections and his sculptures seen in front of significant buildings around Toronto. Many of his later landscapes are held by his remaining four children who have chosen to exhibit them for sale at gallery23 in Port Dover, hoping that each of them will find a place in the home of an art lover who will appreciate the provenance of the piece.

Quotes:

“There was always a consistency and intelligence about Yarwood’s work. It never made a flamboyant impression but it was always good … I would say he was one of the most intelligent members of the group and very deeply involved in that whole movement of Abstract Expressionism.” ~ writer and critic Robert Fulford, one of the early critical champions of Painters Eleven.

“With a very real bent for analyzing empathy as well as being a good painter, (Yarwood) is an artist of stature to command unusual respect.” ~ Pearl McCarthy, Art and Artists

Jeremy Hayes

Jeremy started making art pieces in 1997. He had seen some folky eel looking carvings that a friend had bought on a visit out east, said the usual: “I can do that!” and was challenged to do so. Creating imaginative, colourful folk art has now become one of Jeremy’s many pastimes.

He works in the tradition of self-taught artists. He tells of being inspired by the memory of a hand rail on a dock on Jack’s Lake. Someone had used a piece of cedar driftwood, added two bottle caps for eyes, and paint, and fashioned a hand rail. The years of exposure to the elements and many hands had removed most of the paint and left the surface smoothly polished – a simple beautiful object.

The majority of Jeremy’s work is made from found materials. He can visualize what a piece of wood or metal can become. Using pinecones, seed pods, street-cleaner bristles, hair clips and any number of other lost and found items, Jeremy brings to life animals and birds with very distinct personalities and then lends his own charm to them by naming them and signing each in a unique manner.

In this collection, Jeremy has created and recreated game boards from the well-loved Snakes and Ladders and Pick-Up-Snakes to unique games like Punker Parcheesi, Snakey and Nines and the ever-popular Dover Dam Game.

His work reflects a lifelong observation and love of nature combined with an appreciation of legends, myths, art and history.

Ron Bezzo

Carolinian Woodturnings: Ron is passionate about wood – cherry, maple, box elder, chestnut, walnut and all sorts of burls. His creations are spectacularly beautiful! Many of his wood pieces are ornamental but several are also functional with food-safe finishes. Ron has been exhibiting work from his shop near Vittoria and in art shows around Southern Ontario for many years and is truly talented and vastly experienced as an artist using wood as his medium.

M. Danyet Cunningham

M. Danyet Cunningham carves soapstone, limestone, alabaster, marble and slate. She is exploring the medium both in the round and through relief. Her work reflects the influence of myth, Celtic and Native work, Nature and her personal internal world. Some sculptures are abstract landscapes exploring flow and planes.

M. Danyet took the opportunity to train with Doug Stephens and George Pratt using a variety of stone types: Sandy Cline with Quebec Soapstone, Wayne Hill exploring Mask and Totem carving, John Sabourin with soapstone and Mel Andre with wood carving. She also studied interpretive painting of Native and Celtic Legends with David Johnson.

M. Danyet was an educator in Southwestern Ontario with degrees at University of Western Ontario: OCT; Honours Specialist – Biology and Kinesiology; Masters Arts – Kinesiology; Honours BSc – Pharmacology and Toxicology.

***

Kit Julian and Vera Cline-Hayes

"In Sync" - June 10 to July 26, 2016

Kit Julian

Kit Julian creates, embellishes and integrates textile, sewing haberdashery and natural materials in variety of styles in her art.  She challenges her craft by using unconventional frames, constantly exploring and expanding ideas by integrating function, form and personal iconography in her images.  Kit works from her studio on the Lynn Valley Road in Simcoe and recommends contacting her prior to visiting to make certain that she is available.  kitjulian.ca

Exhibitions, group shows:
Lighthouse Festival Theatre Gallery October 2007, 2010

Perch Gallery 2007

Arts Country Gallery Port Dover 2012-2014

Norfolk Arts Centre Simcoe 2013

Station Arts Centre Tillsonburg  2013

Waterford Old Town Hall 2015, 2016
Norfolk Studio Tour 2009 - 2016

Vera Cline-Hayes

Vera Cline-Hayes graduated from Central Secondary School in London, Ontario.  She furthered her studies, taking a two-year fine arts course where she developed her unique pen and ink style.

Upon graduating, she accepted a position in the art department of London Life Insurance Company.  Over the next several years, Vera continued to exhibit at shows across Ontario with her pen and ink designs.

She opened an art emporium in Waterford in 1987 and has continued her passion for art, exhibiting in the Norfolk Studio Art Tour and at various art shows.  In 2012 she was accepted into the prestigious Arts Country Juried Arts Competition.  As well she has been accepted in the juried Norfolk ArtsCo Visual Arts Competition, where she received honorable mention for her work.

On a commercial level, Vera’s artwork has been chosen by two American giftware companies for widespread circulation of her designs on various products.

Emma Smith

Emma Smith is a wood-firing potter working from her home studio in Jerseyville, ON. A graduate of the Sheridan College and Fleming College ceramic programs, she creates humble objects for everyday use. Her work encourages community gatherings and the sharing of a meal, by providing delight in

the ordinary and unnecessary. They are made to be enjoyed with quality food, love, and laughter! Emma is currently a ceramic instructor at Mohawk College, and has exhibited her work across Canada and the United States. She and her partner have recently opened Black & Smith Country General, a destination shop purveying a curated collection of local artwork and farm goods.

 

Pamela Kinney

Pamela specializes in gold and sterling silver jewellery and holloware using only top quality gemstones and pearls. She enjoys creating unique custom pieces of jewellery for her clients often incorporating personal stories and elements of nature into each commissioned design. Pamela has created a wide range of sterling silver jewellery including Rings, Brooches, Necklaces, Bracelets, Earrings and Pendants. She works with a wide variety of pearls of various types and sizes. Pamela apprenticed with Lois Etherington Betteridge, the premier Gold and Silversmith in Canada, in Holloware and Silver and Goldsmithing. Pamela was born and raised in Brantford, Ontario. She currently resides in St. Williams. Professional Experience: Curator/ Director - Rail's End Gallery, Haliburton, ON; Organizer & Coordinator - Arts In The Park, Haliburton, ON; Childrens' Book Illustration and Design for: Oxford University Press, Ginn & Company, Copp Clarke Pittman, Addisson Wesley, Gage; Advertising Illustration and Design in: Toronto, ON, Canada and Sao Paulo, Brazil; Head of Art Dept. @ Harbourfront Centre, Toronto, ON; Art Gallery Assistant under Anita Aarrons @ Harbourfront Centre, Toronto, ON; Printmaking Instructor in Southwestern Ontario (London, Ingersoll and Woodstock). Arts Education: NSCAD (Nova Scotia College of Art & Design/ Dalhousie University) - Printmaking Major; Fanshawe College - Printmaking Major, Cold Glass Minor; Sheridan College - Fine Arts Program. 

***

Kathryn Hogg

"Vibrations" - April 21 to June 6, 2016

Kathryn Hogg has been a public gallery curator, art educator, and lecturer while pursuing her own art career. She graduated from McMaster University in Fine Arts and also studied at Three Schools Art School, Toronto, Banff School of Fine Arts, Alberta, and Dundas Valley School of Art.She works as a sculptor and painter with an exhibition history of solo and group shows in Canada and USA. Her work is in private and public collections including the Fisherman Memorial sculpture located on the pier in Port Dover.The paintings for the exhibition, Vibrations, focus on the figure in space and time. Working from her home studio in Waterford ON, Kathryn integrates her interest in science, the history of art and philosophy, which impacts her paintings.

Amber Kalmar

Amber Kalmar is a jeweller and designer. Her work is hand crafted in her studio in Port Dover, ON. As a metalsmith her work is produced in silver and/or gold.

Using jewellery as a exploration of wearable art, she embraces process-driven work, experimenting in the movement of metal, techniques of textures and plays of colour within precious metals. Her work is often inspired by her Norfolk County and Southern Ontario sourroundings.

Amber is a George Brown graduate, from the Jewellery Arts Program 2011. Her work has been shown at the Norfolk Arts Centre in the "Made in Norfolk" show and the "Meet the Maker" lecture series as well as past events at the Catherwood Kiln, Vittoria.

Sherry Dresser

Sherry is a local artist who has always had a passion to create.  Clay quickly became Sherry's medium of choice after taking a local pottery class almost twenty years ago.  She produces an extensive line of tableware and has fun creating a wonderful selection of whimsical ornaments.  

Through theexploration of smoke and raku firing methods,  Sherry's work has evolved to include award-winning sculptural forms.  Raku, meaning "pleasure", is a primitive firing method that enhances the simplicity and beauty of clay.

***

Vicki Easton-McClung

"The Jet Set" - February 26 to April 15, 2016

vicki picture

Vicki was born in Brantford in 1954. She studied Commercial Art at Mohawk College and Environmental Art at Fanshawe College in London, Ontario. She has exhibited work since 1977 in private and public galleries extensively in Southern Ontario.

Vicki and her husband recently retired from their nursery and landscape business in Port Dover and now sell organic vegetables and flowers at their roadside self-serve wagon. She works at home in her studio where she is currently working on a new body of landscape mixed media paintings.

Vicki’s work has been shown in several solo exhibitions, some of which are listed below, as well as group exhibitions and can be found in some public collections.

Shona Cairncross

Shona was born in Ontario in 1976. Her jewelry design is focused predominantly on chainwork, using individual rings to create intricate weave patterns that in some cases are adaptations of designs historically used by armorers in the creation of chainmail armor.

Shona is a graduate with distinction of the Graphic Design program at Mohawk College in Hamilton and completed a B.A. with Honors in History and English at Wilfred Laurier University in Waterloo. Her two dimensional work in watercolour has appeared in Glenhust Art Gallery of Brant and the Robert Langdon Gallery, Waterloo. Current works featuring digitally rendered images created using 3D modelling software can be seen on Renderosity.com.

Shona lives and works in Milton, Ontario.

Jeremy Hayes

Jeremy started making art pieces in 1997. He works in the tradition of self-taught artists.

The majority of Jeremy’s work is made from found materials. He can visualize what a piece of wood or metal can become. Using pinecones, seed pods, street-cleaner bristles, hair clips and any number of other lost and found items, Jeremy brings to life animals and birds with very distinct personalities and then lends his own charm to them by naming them and signing each in a unique manner.

His work reflects a lifelong observation and love of nature combined with an appreciation of legends, myths, art and history.

***

Garry Walker

"The Road Home" - January 4 to February 22, 2016

 
Gary has been a painter, sculptor, builder, designer all of his working life of 40 years or so. He went to Ontario College of Art in the early 70s and has, in recent years, began to rediscover art for art’s sake and all the freedom that entails. Carving out a little time to appreciate nature and the rural world around him he has found a renewed interest in how to approach landscape painting.
For this exhibit he wanted not only to explore the abstraction of landscape but also to present it in a new, more contemporary frame. He liked the idea of surrounding the painting with a complimentary field of colour that would help to control how you view the piece and eliminate any other colour influence. Also, he wanted to paint some smaller pieces. The “Hollyhocks” multimedia piece was done at the end of the series as a fun piece and is not intended as part of the series but simply a bit of sculptural diversion.

Ian Bell

 
Ian Bell grew up in Waterford and studied film animation at Sheridan College in the early 1970s. Since then he has worked as an illustrator, folksinger, graphic designer, songwriter, freelance broadcaster and museum curator. (He says these are all an excellent measure of his abilities as an animator) In recent years Ian has been creating a body of works on canvas and panel that give glimpses of his life as a musician and as a documentarian of his home turf. Like his songs, many of Ian's paintings contain strong elements of place and narrative.

Carolyn Muir

Dragonfly Creations

Carolyn has always been fascinated with glass and jewellery. Working with beautiful handmade lampwork beads inspired her to learn how to produce them herself. Carolyn has been making art glass beads since 2004.
She loves the process of melting glass, adding metal foils and wire to create reactions and playing with etching to produce a variety of styles. Her style continues to change and evolve as she strives to learn new techniques and experiment with new glass.  She is inspired by the interplay between light and colour that can be realized in the glass medium.
Carolyn creates jewellery using sterling silver and copper components to best complement her lampwork  beads. 

***

George Conklin

"As The Raven Flies"  - October 30 to December 21, 2015

lillypad painting
 
George Conklin’s landscapes are a celebration of the seasons, each one inspired by nature and transposed through oil onto the canvas with keen attention to light, air and atmospheric perspective.
George grew up in southwestern Ontario surrounded by wildlife, birds, streams and woodlots, later travelling, camping and canoeing in northern Ontario and Algonquin Park where he experienced the visual drama of wild northern scenery.
Among others, George studied with the late George Nelson, a retired designer/painter, who had studied at the famed “Arts Students League” in New York City. Nelson’s work had the most impact on George’s style and under his tutelage, he studied open-air painting in the French Impressionist tradition. George is still faithful to these philosophies and techniques, capturing his impressions of nature and her many moods. 
 
Also exhibiting from October 30 to December 21, 2015: jewellery by Pamela Kinney, pottery by Melissa Schooley, and folk art creatures made from found items by Jeremy Hayes.

Pamela Kinney

Pamela specializes in gold and sterling silver jewellery and holloware using only top quality gemstones and pearls. She enjoys creating unique custom pieces of jewellery for her clients, often incorporating personal stories and elements of nature into each commissioned design. Pamela has created a wide range of sterling silver jewellery including rings, brooches, necklaces, bracelets, earrings and pendants. She works with a wide variety of pearls of various types and sizes. Pamela apprenticed with Lois Etherington Betteridge, the premier Gold and Silversmith in Canada, in Holloware and Silver and Goldsmithing. Pamela was born and raised in Brantford, Ontario. She currently resides in St. Williams. Professional Experience: Curator/ Director - Rail's End Gallery, Haliburton, ON; Organizer & Coordinator - Arts In The Park, Haliburton, ON; Childrens' Book Illustration and Design for: Oxford University Press, Ginn & Company, Copp Clarke Pittman, Addisson Wesley, Gage; Advertising Illustration and Design in: Toronto, ON, Canada and Sao Paulo, Brazil; Head of Art Dept. @ Harbourfront Centre, Toronto, ON; Art Gallery Assistant under Anita Aarrons @ Harbourfront Centre, Toronto, ON; Printmaking Instructor in Southwestern Ontario (London, Ingersoll and Woodstock). Arts Education: NSCAD (Nova Scotia College of Art & Design/ Dalhousie University) - Printmaking Major; Fanshawe College - Printmaking Major, Cold Glass Minor; Sheridan College - Fine Arts Program.

Melissa Schooley

Melissa grew up on an apple orchard in Southern Ontario, and admits that her favourite times were spent playing, sculpting, creating with her mom's homemade play dough. 
After high school, she dabbled in the sciences but finally found her calling at Emily Carr University of Art and Design in Vancouver, where she completed a Bachelor's of Fine Arts, Visual Arts Degree. She never looked back.
 
Melissa has been a full time potter since 2005 and is currently working in functional porcelain. Her attention to detail and fine design along with thousands of hours of working the clay and creating unique glazes has made Melissa one of the premiere potters in Ontario.

Angela Hardy 

Angela Hardy Artwork

"in this moment"

August 28 - October 23, 2015

Angela was born in Newfoundland, raised in Labrador and graduated from the Nova Scotia College of Art and Design. She has become a member of the Port Dover community over the past two years gracefully, quietly, emphasizing her love for the lake, small town and those who live here, through her art. Angela sees her surroundings with a punch of colour, views people in the most beautiful light. When we are with Angela, we feel free to take our glasses off and look around a little less sharply, less critically. After wandering through an exhibition of her paintings we are obliged to walk away seeing our world a little differently.


Bruce Steinhoff

Bruce Steinhoff painting

gallery23 is honoured to have several outstanding landscape paintings by Bruce Steinhoff in our inaugural exhibition.

Bruce has lived in this area for much of his life, travelling extensively with bike and tent to find inspiration for his work. Many of the paintings in this collection are from northern Ontario. In others, he has captured the beauty of riverbanks and lakes in Quebec and in Norfolk County.

The gallery is open and visitors are welcome to wander through Monday to Friday 9:00 to 5:00 and other times by chance or appointment. Please feel free to call Janet at 519-718-1519 if you wish to visit at times outside of the regular hours.

~

"There is a powerful and fresh feeling to Bruce’s work that keeps his paintings not only classic, but contemporary. Roberts Gallery is fortunate to have had a two-decade relationship with one of Canada’s great landscape painters.” ~ Paul T. Wildridge, Director, Roberts Gallery Ltd., Toronto

“Bruce’s work continues to be impressive. He has an intuitive, natural talent and his work is raw, honest and fresh.” ~ Robert McKinnon, Toronto architect and art collector

 “Bruce is an artist in the great and wonderful tradition of Canadian landscape paintings, but an artist whose vision is still fresh and innovative.” ~ Charles F. Scott, Toronto litigation lawyer and art collector


Go back to current exhibition

Go home